Events

2017 Women & Other Minorities in Humanities Conference

PhilSoc is proud to present our annual Women & Other Minorities in Humanities Conference, this year also as part of the Student Union’s LiberatEd (GenderJam). The aim of the conference is to raise awareness of gender and minority biases and discrimination in humanities, academia and society.

The conference will run from 9:30am to 5pm on Friday the 10th of March. This year, we will be running 3 lectures and 2 workshops, so feel free to drop in and out throughout the day.  The event is free, and we welcome students of all fields of study. Catering in the form of tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided!

Conference Schedule:
Morning session: 9.30 – 12.00
7 George Square, Room S.1

9.30 – 10.40
Lecture: ‘Is False Consciousness false?’
Dr Elinor Mason, University of Edinburgh

10.50 -12.00
Workshop on Helen Longino and Gender in the Philosophy of Science
Prof Michela Massimi, University of Edinburgh
See below for recommended readings

LUNCH

Afternoon session: 13.30 – 17.00
David Hume Tower, Room LG.09

13.30 -14.40
Lecture: ‘Kant and Race’
Prof Stella Sandford, Kingston University London

14.45-15.45
Workshop on ‘Privilege in academia’
Dr Aidan McGlynn, University of Edinburgh
See below for recommended readings

15.50-17.00
Lecture: ‘Empowering minority women: Autonomy versus participation’
Dr Andrea Baumeister, University of Stirling


Recommended Readings for Prof. Massimi’s workshop:
Longino, Helen E. (1991). Multiplying subjects and the diffusion of power. The Journal of Philosophy, 88(11), 666. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2027028
Longino, H. (1992). Taking Gender Seriously in Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, 1992(2), 333-340. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/192847

Recommended Readings for Dr. McGlynn’s workshop:
Gat, Roxanne (2012). Peculiar Benefits. URL: http://therumpus.net/2012/05/peculiar-benefits/

If you lack access to these, feel free to send us a message and we try to help.

For more details please visit out Conference Website: http://euwmp.weebly.com/ and RSVP on our Facebook event.

Week 6 Events

Reading and Film Group
Monday, 27th February; 7 pm, David Hume Tower Lower Ground (DHT LG) 0.6 (Map)
Film: “The Look of Silence” (2014), Dir. Joshua Oppenheimer (IMDb)
Discussion Group
Tuesday, 28th February; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Topic: Philosophy of Law
Academic Support Office Hours
Wednesday, 1st March; 3.00 pm until 5.00 pm; Dugald Stewart Building (DSB), Room 3.01.

Guest Lecture

Thursday, 2nd March; 6.15 pm, David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre B.

Speaker: Prof. Joachim Gentz, University of Edinburgh

Interests: Ancient Chinese Philosophy

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

Green Festival Lecture

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PhilSoc is hosting an event for this year’s Green Festival! Sustain.ED is Edinburgh’s first citywide green festival brought to you by the Students’ Association Sabbatical Officer team. Bring along your thinking caps for a talk by Dr Mike Hannis, and consider the freedoms and limitations of environmental policy.

Time: 6:45pm

We recommend you arrive five to ten minutes early. This lecture is free and open to all.


Location: Teviot Row House, Study

TITLE: Is Environmentalism a Threat to Freedom?
Dr Mike Hannis of Bath Spa University

ABSTRACT: An adviser to the current US president has declared that “the environmental movement is the greatest threat to freedom and prosperity in the modern world”. This talk begins by examining how this striking claim may be understood, before moving on to consider how the thinking behind it might be countered. Drawing on material from my recent book “Freedom and Environment”, I explore how competing conceptions of freedom deal with the awkward fact that human civilisations exist within physical limits. I conclude (with Robyn Eckersley) that sustainability should be seen as a condition for autonomy, not a constraint upon it. Along the way I discuss liberalisms, capabilities, rights, and virtues. I also argue that there can be no sustainability without egalitarianism.

https://www.eusa.ed.ac.uk/ents/event/8509/
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For more details about our event, visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/1867060096903502/
If you have any questions about the festival please contact vps@eusa.ed.ac.uk.

Week 5 Events

Please Note: This week’s Discussion Group will take place in Usher’s
Reading and Film Group
Monday, 13th February; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Reading: Susan Bordo’s Anorexia Nervosa: Psychopathology as the Crystallization of
Culture
.
(Next week’s film: “The Look of Silence” (2014), Dir. Joshua Oppenheimer (IMDb) )
Discussion Group
Tuesday, 14th February; 7 pm, Usher’s, West Nicolson Street (Map)
Topic: Liberty
Academic Support Office Hours
Wednesday, 15th February; 3.00 pm until 5.00 pm, Dugald Stewart Building (DSB), Room 3.01.

Guest Lecture

Thursday, 16th February; 6.15 pm, David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre B.

Speaker: Prof. Komarine Romdenh-Romluc, University of Sheffield

Title: “Being in love with Merleau-Ponty
Abstract: What is love? One might be tempted by the view that love is a type of feeling, and to be in love is to feel a certain kind of way. If this were true, it seems to follow that no-one could be mistaken about whether or not they were in love. But this seems wrong. People are regularly confused about such matters. How, then, should we understand love? In this talk, I will explore Merleau-Ponty’s account. Merleau-Ponty argues that love is a way of perceiving, and interacting with, the world. Perception, for him, does not present the perceiver with ‘neutral’ information about entities. It immerses her in a rich world of things that ‘invite’ her to act. It does this in part because it has an affective dimension – things literally look scary (inviting us to run away), foreboding (demanding that we avoid them), enticing (drawing us into them), and so on. To be in love, for Merleau-Ponty, is to perceive one’s beloved as demanding certain kinds of loving behaviour. It also ‘lights up’ other parts of the world, so that the cafe where we always meet is infused with a welcoming glow, the noisy children invite affection rather than annoyance, and the time between the loved one’s visits become an interminable wait when I lose interest in all my usual pursuits. It is also to act in ways that are in line with these perceptions of the world. On this view, love becomes a thread woven through the fabric of one’s life; a certain ‘style’ of perceiving and acting. Merleau-Ponty then tells us that real love is one that concerns a person’s whole being, whilst illusory love is such that it only touches us at a superficial level. To the person concerned, they can sometimes appear the same. Sometimes, it is only when reflecting on the patterning of one’s life that one can tell if one has really been in love.

Week 4 Events

Reading and Film Group
Monday, 6th February; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Reading: Anita L. Allen’s Atmospherics: Abortion Law and Philosophy.
(Next week’s reading: Susan Bordo’s Anorexia Nervosa: Psychopathology as the Crystallization of Culture)
Discussion Group
Tuesday, 7th February; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Topic: Science vs. Pseudo-science
Academic Support Office Hours
Wednesday, 8th February; 1.30 pm until 3.30 pm, Dugald Stewart Building (DSB), Room 5.01.

 

Guest Lecture

Thursday, 9th February; 6.15 pm, David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre B.

Speaker: Prof. David Bloor, University of Edinburgh

Title: “Relativism and Mr. Trump”
Abstract: Donald Trump became president of the USA after a campaign notable for its mendacity. Why did such behaviour attract, rather than repel, votes? Some commentators answer this question by saying that we live in a post-truth age. But how did that come about? Part of the blame has been attributed to a group of academics, called ‘relativists’, who are said to have undermined the respect for truth. I shall examine this argument and show that, among other mistakes, it rests on an absurd misrepresentation of relativism. There are Trump-like tendencies in the academic world but they find expression in the anti-relativist, not the relativist, literature.

Week 3 Events

(Please not changed Academic Support time and location)
Reading and Film Group
Monday, 30th January; 7 pm, David Hume Tower (DHT) Lower Ground (LG.06). (Map)
Film: Paprika (2006) – Dir. Satoshi Kon (IMDb)
Discussion Group
Tuesday, 31st January; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Topic: Philosophy of Mathematics
Academic Support Office Hours
Wednesday, 1st February; 1.30 pm until 3.30 pm, Dugald Stewart Building (DSB), Room 5.01.

Guest Lecture

Thursday, 2nd February; 6.15 pm, David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre B.

Speaker: Prof. James Ladyman, University of Bristol

Interests: Philosophy of Science

Title: TBA
Abstract: TBA

Week 2 Events

Please Note that Academic Support has been moved to Wednesday afternoons, from 1:30 – 3:30pm in DSB 3.01.
Reading and Film Group
Monday, 23th January; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Reading: Patricia Churchland’s Epistemology in the Age of Neuroscience.
[Next week’s film: “Paprika” (2006) Dir. Satoshi Kon]
Discussion Group
Tuesday, 24th January; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Topic: Philosophy of Mind and Memory
Academic Support Office Hours (Please note changed times!)
Wednesday, 25th January; 1.30 pm until 3.30 pm, Dugald Stewart Building (DSB), Room 3.01

Guest Lecture

Thursday, 26th January; 6.15 pm, David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre B

Speaker: Prof. Simon Prosse, University of St AndrewsInterests: Philosophy of Mind

Title: TBA
Abstract: TBA

Re-Fresher’s Debate

Athens

Our first event of the year 2017: a debate about the place of philosophy in society, followed by drinks! Whether you are a new student who wants to get a taste of PhilSoc, or a returning member, come join us at Southside Social (upper area) from 7:30pm on Friday, 20th January.

We don’t assume any previous philosophical knowledge, and will guide the debate with questions, so any student can attend!

If you’re not already a member, you can also purchase your PhilSoc membership for semester 2 for a reduced £5!

Looking forward to seeing many of you there for some philosophizing and socializing!

 

Welcome to Semester 2! Week 1 Events

The winter holiday season has finally drawn to a close, and we at PhilSoc wish you all the best with the term ahead. Come kick off the new year with our regular line-up of fantastic events this week!
Reading and Film Group
Monday, 16th January; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)

Reading: The Repugnant Conclusion, part 4 of Derek Parfit’s Reasons and Persons. 

(Next week’s reading: Patricia Churchland’s ‘Epistemology in the Age of Neuroscience’)

Our Reading and Film Groups begin with 2 weeks of readings followed by the screening of a film on the third week. This is the first week of the first block for this semester. NO assumed knowledge. This block’s theme is The Future .
Discussion Group
Tuesday, 17th January; 7 pm, The New Amphion, Teviot Row House (Map)
Topic: The Existence of God
Grab a coffee/pint and join us for some philosophical discussion. NO assumed knowledge and all are welcome! You can also follow the discussion on twitter.
Academic Support Office Hours
Thursday, 19th January; 2 pm until 4 pm, Dugald Stewart Building (DSB), Room 5.01.
Our academic support officer will be holding Open Access office hours. Open to all undergraduate Philosophy students with focus on pre-honours. Come along at any time with queries such as class content (including Logic), tutorial readings, class essays and exams, and general peer support.
Guest Lecture

Thursday, 19th January; 6.15 pm, David Hume Tower, Lecture Theatre B.

Speaker: Prof. Robin LePoidevin, University of Leeds

Title: ‘Modal Horrors
Abstract:
A legitimate reaction to the idea that other possible worlds are concretely real is horror at the thought of truly hellish worlds existing not just in the imagination but in reality. But is this reaction of any significance when it comes to assessing the truth of the hypothesis? In general, do appeals to emotional attitudes have a place in metaphysical debates? In this talk I examine a well-known attempt to derive a metaphysical conclusion, concerning the passage of time, from emotional attitudes and pursues a parallel (and, I suggest, more successful) argument concerning the nature of possibility. I attempt to explain why appeals to emotion are more common in ethics than metaphysics, and offer a (very!) speculative hypothesis about the origin and purpose of thought about the possible.

PhilSoc Christmas Party

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It’s time once again for PhilSoc’s annual Christmas Party! Come celebrate the end of term by taking a break from revision and meeting with all your PhilSoc friends for one last romp!

Join us in the downstairs area of The Whistle Stop Barber Shop, from 7:30pm to late on Saturday, 10th of December. We highly recommend joining in with Formal dress to properly celebrate, if you’re a fancy mood. But if the cold winter winds make you more inclined to don your favorite sweater, formal dress is optional!

Check out our Facebook event for more details.